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Pandas Celebrate 50 Years at Washington National Zoo

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Pandas
Pandas

Giant pandas have marked their 50th year at the Washington National Zoo. Giant pandas are the zoo’s most popular attraction according The Mining Journal. Pandas were received by the zoo fifty years prior due a special international agreement. This was done by the President Nixon’s government and China in 1972. Furthermore, then-President Nixon’s landmark visit to China sparked the exchange in the first place.

National zoo panda
(Image Source: Pixabay/Dimhou)

The National Zoo presented pandas Mei Xiang and Xiao Qi Ji with a cake. Of course, this was not the cake we human beings are accustomed to. Instead, this cake was made from frozen fruit juice, sweet potatoes, carrots and sugar cane. It seemed that the pandas enjoyed their cake. After all, it took them about fifteen minutes to consume the cake.

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The giant panda is an herbivore with an incredible appetite. They spend a little more than half of their day eating their favorite dish, bamboos. A single giant panda can eat more than 28 pounds of bamboo each day. Despite sitting and eating around all day, pandas are expert climbers. Moreover, they are excellent swimmers as well.

Pandas are not named until their gender is found out and that they reach a certain age. Moreover, the pandas may only receive a Chinese name. This keeps in line with Chinese tradition of naming pandas that goes several centuries back. All pandas are owned by the Chinese government as per international law. Furthermore, this applies to all cubs born as well. Pandas are given to several zoos on expensive loans.

national zoo giant panda
(Image Source: Pixabay/Raw2daBon3)

The great news about is that they are no longer endangered. Thanks to international efforts, the giant panda has been saved from extinction. Therefore, they have been bumped up to the vulnerable category. However, we should push further until they are ‘least concerned’ according to the IUCN’s Red List. Thankfully, their numbers are increasing. Thus, this can be a very likely accomplishment.

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